Scripture More Clearly Translated

Hebrews 5:9: Christ Was ‘Made Perfect’ – (More Clearly Translated And Explained).

The aim of this explanation is to more clearly translate Hebrews 5:9 in order to demonstrate that Christ has always been sinless, and thus did not need to be made ‘perfect’.

To some the more popular translations may be communicating contrary to this.

This will also assist in better understanding the next verse, as it is chronological and in agreement with Isaiah 42:6, and 49:8 – in that after Christ finished here (died, and was raised from the dead = ‘given’), he became high priest in the order of Melchizadek (Psalm 45:7, 110:4), for the new covenant (Jeremiah 31:31).

How Prayer Actually Works: ‘…ask for anything in my name, and I will do it.’ (John 14:13-14, 14:16 Explained)

These two verses are being highlighted to try to explain the basics of how prayer Actually works.

From this we will see how here is no ‘trinity’ implied in the verses, by explaining two main facts, which briefly are;

A) Do we ask Christ for things in prayer?

No. The correct translation for these two verses in this instance is the KJV, which does not instruct any such thing.

B) What does it mean when it says Christ ‘will do it’ in both verses?

After we read John 14:16 with our two subject verses, we see that one of Christ’s duties is to pray to the Father – and this is consistent with other verses such as Isaiah 53:12 and Romans 8:34 which both state Christ ‘intercedes’ for people to G-d.

This is what Christ does as high priest in the order of Melchizadek (Psalm 110:4, Hebrews 5:10);

A person prays to G-d in Christ’s name (in honor/recognition of), and then Christ intercedes on our behalf with G-d.

The Commandment Is ‘…not too hard for you…’ – (Deuteronomy 30:11 Explained).

‘not too hard…’ – or is it – ‘not hidden…’?

Deuteronomy 30:11, can be quite hard to understand when read in many English translations on this occaision.

The purpose of this explanation is to show that observing all commandments on this fallen earth, is actually very hard (Acts 15:10), especially without sinning; Thus any translation which states it is ‘…not too hard for you…’, might not be best communicating the meaning of the verse.

1 John 2:1-2: ‘…propitiation for our sins…’ –  Christ Makes Intercession, And Is Not A Human Sacrifice (Explained)

This explanation aims to show how God’s good commandments forbid human sacrifices (ref. Deuteronomy 24:16, Ezekiel 18:20), and thus 1 John 2:1-2 (or any other similar verse for that matter) is in no way saying that Christ (Messiah) was a literal human sacrifice for our sins.

Instead, with verse 1 first telling us that Christ is our ‘advocate’, the word typically translated as ‘propitiation’ in 1 John 2:2 is then reviewed.

We see that the English dictionary’s definition for ‘propitiation’ can be defined as ‘appeasing’, and in phrase form can be described as how ‘Christ lifts his hands in prayer to God as our representation in a propitiation-like, priestly manner, to please Him on our behalf.’.

We will see that this is the better rendering and translation of what the word ‘propitiation’ means in this instance, as other verses confirm Christ appeases G-d, by praying (interceding) for us here (Isaiah 53:12, Romans 8:34), as advocate and mediator (1 John 2:1, 1 Timothy 2:5).

‘Unbelievers Judged By The Law Of Moses.’ And What Happens After Death? – (Revelation 20:12-13, Romans 2:12-13)

The purpose of this explanation is to show that G-d judges all people, even non-believers, by what He has stated is good and bad in His Law, the Law of Moses (Torah).

Revelation 20:12-13 will be explained and lightly re-translated legally later for support, to show that this is the case.

A brief explanation of what believers and unbelievers can expect after death (judgement, a potential long life above, ‘reincarnation’ back to this old earth) – is also given, with references.

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Psalm 45:6-7 Translated More Accurately – ‘g’ and ‘G’ (There is No trinity)

Many English translations render all instances of the word ‘god’ in Psalm 45:6-7 with a capital letter ‘G’ – even when speaking about the Messiah (Christ).

This can create confusion and lead a believer to mistakenly think that this passage supports the incorrect ‘trinity’ doctrine, as a consequence.

The following clearer translation assists a person in reading the verses in their proper context.

May this rendering of the passage be fruitful;

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