Rosh Hashanah: How The Seventh Month, And Not The First – Is The New Year

Rosh Hashanah: How The Seventh Month, And Not The First – Is The New Year.

The aim of this explanation is to share how Rosh Hashanah (The Feast of Trumpets – ref. Leviticus 23:24), which takes place on the first day of the seventh month (Tishrei) on the Hebrew calandar, is actually the beginning of the new year – despite Nisan (Abib) being described as the beginning of the year in Exodus 12:2.

The contextual explanation for Nisan being that Nisan it is the first of months from the beginning of your exodus.

Loving Enemies, Discipline, Wrath, and Overcoming.

Exploring how the view of the relatively righteous living on the earth during the times of the Old Testament (Tanakh), was the same as those living in the times of the New Testament (Brit Chadasha) – with regards to blessing enemies, instead of cursing them.

The difference between discipline and wrath is briefly looked at also.

‘Propitiation’: Intercession, Not Human Sacrifice (1 John 2:2, Isaiah 53:12)

This explanation aims to show how God’s good commandments forbid human sacrifices (ref. Deuteronomy 23:16, Ezekiel 18:20), and thus 1 John 2:2 (or any other verse for that matter) is in no way saying that Christ (Messiah) was a literal human sacrifice;

He is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world.
1 John 2:2 ESV

This explanation aims to share both contextually and linguistically.

We will find that the word ‘propitiation’ here in 1 John 2:2, refers to Messiah (Christ) praying to G-d for transgressors (ref. Isaiah 53:12), and does not allude to him being a literal blood sacrifice.

Further, the rule and way of interpretation found within this article, will assist a person in understanding that verses which read along the lines of;

• ‘…the blood of Jesus Christ makes us clean…’ (ref. 1 John 1:7),

• ‘…he was wounded for our transgressions…’ (ref. Isaiah 53:5)

or even,

• ‘He is the propitiation for our sins…’ (1 John 2:2 ESV)

– are figurative and (respectfully) poetic in nature.

https://orthodoxmessianicjudaism.com/2021/03/10/propitiation-1-john-2-2-isaiah-5312/

May it be fruitful.

Shalom v’kind regards,

http://www.theGodofIsrael.com
http://www.FewWhoFindit.com

Why did Christ say; ‘…my God my God, why have you forsaken me…’?

When the risen King Messiah (Christ) was crucified, some of his very last words were…

Galatians 3:24 – ‘…the Law… our tutor to lead us to Christ…’, explained.

‘…this well known phrase is actually the lead-up to the core context of the verse which is located toward the end of it – when it says; ‘…justified by faith.’