Rosh Hashanah: How The Seventh Month, And Not The First – Is The New Year

Rosh Hashanah: How The Seventh Month, And Not The First – Is The New Year.

The aim of this explanation is to share how Rosh Hashanah (The Feast of Trumpets – ref. Leviticus 23:24), which takes place on the first day of the seventh month (Tishrei) on the Hebrew calandar, is actually the beginning of the new year – despite Nisan (Abib) being described as the beginning of the year in Exodus 12:2.

The contextual explanation for Nisan being that Nisan it is the first of months from the beginning of your exodus.

People Of Different Cultures Believed And Observed Torah Law

The purpose of this explanation is to show that people of all different cultures/nations believe the Gospel, and that they also are instructed to observe the Law of Moses with their faith (Romans 3:31 ESV).

This article is primarily written for those who may currently be of the Muslim faith, as it demonstrates how a verse (sura) from the Quran is not in agreement with Holy Scripture.

Loving Enemies, Discipline, Wrath, and Overcoming.

Here some Holy Scriptures from the Old and New Testaments will be shared, and some will also be explained with regard to;

■ Loving Enemies
■ G-d’s Discipline Is Good
■ Overcomming Sin and Trial

1 John 2:1-2: ‘…propitiation for our sins…’ –  Christ Makes Intercession, And Is Not A Human Sacrifice (Explained)

This explanation aims to show how God’s good commandments forbid human sacrifices (ref. Deuteronomy 24:16, Ezekiel 18:20), and thus 1 John 2:1-2 (or any other similar verse for that matter) is in no way saying that Christ (Messiah) was a literal human sacrifice for our sins.

Instead, with verse 1 first telling us that Christ is our ‘advocate’, the word typically translated as ‘propitiation’ in 1 John 2:2 is then reviewed.

We see that the English dictionary’s definition for ‘propitiation’ can be defined as ‘appeasing’, and in phrase form can be described as how ‘Christ lifts his hands in prayer to God as our representation in a propitiation-like, priestly manner, to please Him on our behalf.’.

We will see that this is the better rendering and translation of what the word ‘propitiation’ means in this instance, as other verses confirm Christ appeases G-d, by praying (interceding) for us here (Isaiah 53:12, Romans 8:34), as advocate and mediator (1 John 2:1, 1 Timothy 2:5).

In The Temple – Paul Encourages Gentiles To Observe The Law Of Moses (Acts 21:24, 21:28, 26:19-21)

This explanation of Holy Scripture will show you that the apostle Paul encourages/instructs both Jewish and Gentile believers in Messiah (Christ), to observe the Law of Moses (Torah).

This will be achieved by showing you that the apostle Paul brought and or met with believers who were originally born as Greeks into the temple of G-d to do a commandment (ritual) known as the Nazirite vow, a cleansing statute from the Law of Moses.

From this we also see that both Jews and Gentiles who believe in Messiah (Christ), are deemed Israelites – as the penalty for bringing a non-Jew into the Temple was death in ancient times.

Colossians 2:14 – The Law of Moses was never ‘nailed to the cross’.

Showing how Colossians 2:14 does not say that the Law of Moses (Torah) has been cancelled, rather it states that for a believer, the record of their sins and the corresponding punishment for each sin – are forgiven.

The approach; Believing and Doing – (Romans 3:28, 3:31, 4:11)

Faith and observance. Two verses which demonstrate the approach a believer takes with their repentance once they have heared the gospel (good news) are Romans 3:28 and 3:31 – they read as follows;

Why did Christ say; ‘…my God my God, why have you forsaken me…’? (Matthew 27:46 explained)

Showing how Matthew 27:46 indeed references the beginning of Psalm 22:1

‘…”My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”…’
(Psalm 22:1 NIV)

– however the recitation of the Psalm stops there, and the actual context of what is being communicated is found in Isaiah 49:4

‘…“I have labored in vain;… yet surely my right is with the LORD, and my recompense with my God.”’
(Isaiah 49:4 ESV)

– As only part of the people believed, Isaiah says ‘…laboured in vain…’ (ESV), and this communicates how Christ yearns for all people to be saved, and not just some – much like His Father’s will (1 Timothy 2:3-4, 2 Peter 3:9).

Isaiah also shows us how Christ (Mesaiah) also looked forward to being at the right hand of G-d above, again.