‘My Lord and my God…’ – Explained (John 20:28 Referencing Psalm 84:3)

Biblical Translation Copyright disclaimers

“Scripture quotations are from the ESV® Bible (The Holy Bible, English Standard Version®), copyright © 2001 by Crossway, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. Used by permission. All rights reserved. May not copy or download more than 500 consecutive verses of the ESV Bible or more than one half of any book of the ESV Bible.”

“Scripture quotations are from the ESV® Bible (The Holy Bible, English Standard Version®), copyright © 2001 by Crossway, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. Used by permission. All rights reserved.”

Scripture quotations taken from the New American Standard Bible® (NASB), Copyright © 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995 by The Lockman Foundation Used by permission. www.Lockman.org

“Scripture quotations marked (NIV) are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide. www.zondervan.com The “NIV” and “New International Version” are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by Biblica, Inc.™ “

The Orthodox Jewish Bible Copyright Artists for Israel Intl Used by permission © The Orthodox Jewish Bible fourth edition, OJB. Copyright 2002, 2003, 2008, 2010, 2011 by Artists for Israel International, Inc. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Brief Summary

The aim of this explanation is to simply show that John 20:28 is in no way a verse which supports the man made doctrine known as the ‘trinity’ – therefore it does not state that Christ is G-d.

Instead we will see that righteous Thomas references Psalm 84:3 to Christ, out of love of the word;

‘speaking to one another with psalms…’
(Ephesians 5:19 NIV)

Such conduct and reverence of God’s Holy Scriptures is a pleasing thing to God and worshipful to Him.

In this instance the application of the Psalm is highly contextual.

Subject Verse;

Thomas said to him, “My Lord and my God!”
John 20:28 NIV

Refrenced Psalm;

Even the sparrow finds a home, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, at your altars, O LORD of hosts,  my King and my God.
Psalm 84:3 ESV

Eplanation Of Psalm 84:3

The initial reason why John 20:28 is said to be referring to Psalm 84:3, is the phrase ‘…my King and my God.’ (ESV) – which in John 20:28 it reads ‘…my Lord and my God.’.

One can also see that a reference to this Psalm is highly appropriate, given that king Messiah (Christ) was just recently raised from the dead at that time.

The ‘sparrow’ represents Christ who has been raised from the dead and is now able to go home – to the new heaven and new earth.

Matthew 13:31-32 is a support here, where it uses the metaphor of birds for people who nest in the kingdom of heaven, which is described as a tree with branches.

When it speaks of her ‘young’ being put at G-d’s altars, this is speaking of how believers in Messiah (Christ) all have an eternal place in the new heaven and earth, and even access to the temple in the new heaven (hence, ‘altars’).

This is because the new covenant was put in place at the ‘giving’ Messiah, and at his resurrection (Isaiah 42:6, 49:8, John 3:16, Psalm 45:6-7) – with power, cleansed new hearts being noted from Pentecost (Shavuot) onwards (Luke 24:49, Acts 2).

Luke 7:34-35 also supports here, it states that those who believe in Christ are figuratively spoken of as his ‘offspring’ or ‘children’;

‘The Son of Man… wisdom is proved right by all her children.”’
(Luke 7:34‭-‬35 NIV)

The Psalm mentions the sparrow having young; meaning Christ and all those believing in him.

By Thomas mentioning this verse to Christ (the sparrow in the Psalm), he encapsulates the context of the matter, and this is also a display of reverence to G-d, above.

Minor note: If a person noticed that the Psalm says ‘king’, whilst in John it says ‘lord’ – kindly note that though these two are different Hebrew and Greek words; a king can certainly be addressed as a lord.

Thus, there is contextual association between these two words.

Another verse which references a Psalm can be found here, where the King Messiah (Christ) references Psalm 22:1 ‘My God, my God, why have you forsaken me…’ in Matthew 27:46 out of reverence of the Scriptures.

Hoping it is fruitful.

Shalom and kind regards,

May the Holy G-d bless you beyond maximum, believing in His risen Son the Lord Jesus Christ (Adonai Yehoshua HaMoshiach). Amen.

Kind regards,
http://www.Christianity-in-Context.com
http://www.OrthodoxMessianicJudaism.com
http://www.FewWhoFindit.com

Copyright disclaimers:

“Scripture quotations are from the ESV® Bible (The Holy Bible, English Standard Version®), copyright © 2001 by Crossway, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. Used by permission. All rights reserved. May not copy or download more than 500 consecutive verses of the ESV Bible or more than one half of any book of the ESV Bible.”

“Scripture quotations are from the ESV® Bible (The Holy Bible, English Standard Version®), copyright © 2001 by Crossway, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. Used by permission. All rights reserved.”

“Scripture quotations taken from the New American Standard Bible® (NASB), Copyright © 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995, 2020 by The Lockman Foundation Used by permission. http://www.Lockman.org

“Scripture quotations marked (NIV) are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide. http://www.zondervan.com The “NIV” and “New International Version” are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by Biblica, Inc.™ “

The Orthodox Jewish Bible Copyright Artists for Israel Intl Used by permission © The Orthodox Jewish Bible fourth edition, OJB. Copyright 2002, 2003, 2008, 2010, 2011 by Artists for Israel International, Inc. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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